International Summer Study Courses

Explore Your Options

The core of our program centers around academics. International Summer Study offers you more than 50 course options to learn something new or build upon what you already know. Program students enroll in two courses, with an option to add a bonus one-credit course, earning up to 7 units of credit at the end of the program. Explore the course options available for the program below.

Courses for Summer 2020

International Summer Study offers a variety of academic courses that allow you to discover, innovate, and broaden your horizon. The sampling below showcases the course options available for the 2020 summer term. Please note, the list below is subject to change.

Expand the subject sections below to review details about each course offering.

American Culture Studies

Investigating America
L98 228S, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

This course teaches students how to critically analyze U.S. culture and society and introduces them to the history, methodologies, frameworks, and key questions that have shaped and continue to inform this interdisciplinary field. In this course, we ask probing questions to uplift marginalized voices and experiences as part of an expansive definition of American identity. In this course students study how knowledge and understandings about society and culture are produced and learn approaches to analyzing, curating and interpreting cultural objects and theorizing cultural phenomena. We examine the concept and idea of "America" in local, regional, national, and international contexts and continuums; we explore the lived experiences of diverse American communities within and across cultural and literal borders. This course is offered in tandem with L98 238S American Cultures: Investigating St. Louis by offering both a national and a local lens with which to view American culture, and students are strongly encouraged to enroll in both courses. Through a case study approach, the course engages questions related to the construction of ethnic and racial identities in the U.S.; race and class; social thought and social issues; mass media and popular culture; landscape, borders, and belonging; citizenship and nationhood; language as culture; and American exceptionalism.


Investigating St. Louis
L98 238S, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

When poet Ralph Waldo Emerson visited St. Louis, MO in 1852, he remarked: "At St. Louis, they talk St. Louis incessantly." And this course will do just that--talk St. Louis incessantly. Investigating St. Louis will explore the city's political, cultural, economic, and demographic evolutions, using the city as a case study in which to ground the major transformations that have remade U.S. cities and their metropolitan areas from the nineteenth century to the present day. This course will take an American Culture Studies approach to investigating the history and legacy of urban issues ranging from racial segregation and suburban sprawl, public housing and urban renewal, activism and protest, city planning and policy, and gentrification and displacement. This course will study the city through a combination of published secondary research, primary source documents, and on-site visits, culminating in the creation of a creative final project that examines one St. Louis neighborhood in depth.

Anthropology

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
L48 160B, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

This course covers the basic concepts and theoretical principles of sociocultural anthropology. Course material is presented from Asia, Africa, Melanesia, Latin America, and North America.


Introduction to Archaeology
L48 190B, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past. Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior. Chronologically-ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological, and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present. Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two 1-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to think critically about how the past is presented, and why, and the importance of the past as it relates to the present and future.


Culture and Environment
L48 361, 3 units
M-F 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

An introduction to the ecology of human culture, especially how "traditional" cultural ecosystems are organized and how they change with population density. Topics include foragers, extensive and intensive farming, industrial agriculture, the ecology of conflict, and problems in sustainability.

Archaeology

Introduction to Archaeology
L52 190B, 3 units
M-F 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past. Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior. Chronologically-ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological, and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present. Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two 1-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to think critically about how the past is presented, and why, and the importance of the past as it relates to the present and future.

Art History & Archaeology

History of Western Art, Architecture, and Design
L01 113, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

A history of the visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and design, from the ancient world to the present with emphasis on the relationship of art to society and to political and cultural events.

Biology & Biomedical Sciences

Introduction to Problem-Based Learning in Biology
L41 112, 3 units
MWF, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This course is for students who are interested in learning how scientists discover the underlying mechanisms of human diseases leading to the development of cures and therapies. In this course, students take responsibility for their own active, inquiry-based learning on biological problems that puzzle modern scientists. Instructors will guide students in researching issues of biological importance using primary literature as their principal resource. Learning how to read and interpret existing research articles from scientific literature is emphasized. Topics covered in this class have included cancer, neurological disorders, infectious diseases, the gut microbiome, and stem cell therapy. Students should have a strong background in general biology and be curious and willing to try an active, non-traditional educational experience. The students will be challenged to use their critical and creative thinking in both independent and group work. Prerequisite: High school biology, preferably an Honors or AP course.


Principles of Biology II
L41 2970, 4 units
MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
MWF, 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. (lab option 1); or
MWF, 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (lab option 2)

A broad overview of genetics, including Mendelian assortment, linkage, chromosomal aberrations, variations in chromosome number, mutation, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, and phylogenetics. Three lectures and three laboratory periods each week. Exam dates 6:30-8:30 PM on July 26, August 7, and August 16. Prerequisite: Bio 2960, or permission of instructor.

Business

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
U44 290, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

This course provides an overview of approaches to design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Through an experiential approach, students learn methods for understanding users' needs, synthesizing complex information, identifying directives for design, generating ideas, prototyping, and communicating solutions. Methodologies will reflect multiple areas, including design, engineering, business, and anthropology. The class operates collaboratively tackling a locally relevant problem, such as active transportation or waste management. Students also explore the role of this process in business, organizations promoting social change, and education through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises. No previous experience in design is required.

Chemistry

Introductory General Chemistry II
L07 106, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course covers chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics at a fundamental level, with an emphasis on in-class problem solving. Gas-phase reactions, heterogeneous (multi-phase) reactions, acid-base reactions, and solubility equilibria are introduced first. Chemical thermodynamics is then taught in its relation to chemical equilibrium. The course finishes with chemical kinetics and rate laws. The content is similar to that in Chem 112A, but advanced applications are omitted to allow more in-class guided active learning. Prerequisites: Two years of high-school math, one year of high-school chemistry or physics, and Chemistry 105 or 111A, or by permission of the instructors. Exams at which attendance is required will be given on Tuesdays from 7:00-8:00 p.m.


General Chemistry II Laboratory
L07 152, 2 units
T&Th, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
MWF, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

This course provides an introduction to basic laboratory techniques, the experimental method, and the presentation of scientific data. Additionally, students obtain direct experience with chemical principles and the properties and reactions of substances. The topics and experiments in this course complement the material covered in the Chem 106 and Chem 112A lecture courses. Prerequisite: Chem 105 or 111A and Chem 151. All students registering for CHEM 106  should also register for CHEM 152.


Organic Chemistry II with Lab
L07 262, 4 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
T&Th, 12:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

A course covering certain areas of organic chemistry in more detail than the prerequisite course, with special emphasis on the mechanisms and the synthetic applications of organic reactions and on the organic chemistry of biological compounds. The laboratory includes organic synthesis and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite, Chem 261.

Dance

American Roots of Contemporary Dance
U31 309, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

This course is an introduction to contemporary modern dance, with a particular focus on its American roots. Students will both develop various techniques and learn concepts used by American modern dance pioneers. Elements of improvisation and basic dance composition skills will also be explored. Topics will include the aesthetics and history of American modern dance as well as how the roots of American modern dance continue to influence contemporary dance of the 21st century. No prerequisites.

Drama

Improvisation
L15 233, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of improvisation. Students are provided with the tools and techniques to develop their artistic voice, both individually and within an ensemble, through various theatre games, exercises, and techniques. Students will build self-confidence, develop creativity, hone presentation skills, and have fun through working collaboratively in an ensemble. Both actors and non-actors are encouraged to take this class.

Economics

Introduction to Microeconomics
L11 1011, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Determination of prices; distribution of national income; theory of production. For a thorough introduction to economics, Econ 1021 (104B) also should be taken.


Introduction to Macroeconomics
L11 1021, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Business fluctuations: inflation, recession; monetary and fiscal policy; economic development. For a thorough introduction to economics, Econ 1011 (103B) should also be taken.


Game Theory and its Business Applications
L11 367, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

This course provides an introduction to game theory and its applications in real life economic decisions. Students will learn fundamental game theory concepts, including (but not limited to) Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect Nash equilibrium, etc. Students will also be exposed to how game theory can be applied to a wide variety of economic decisions: pricing, firm's decision of entering or exiting a market, etc. The ultimate goal of this course is to develop students' rational and game-theoretic thinking. Prerequisites: High-school mathematics, Econ 1011 or the equivalent.

English Composition

Analytical Writing
U11 111, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

This course is about reading well and writing deliberately and sees those two acts as intimately related. Students will read as writers, studying the strategies that writers use to write persuasively, and practicing those strategies in their own writing. The course offers a method for close reading (based on finding meaningful patterns); it offers practice linking claims with evidence for those claims and it offers practice organizing papers using such skills as well-written summaries, theses, transitions, topic sentences, and paragraphs.

Entrepreneuership

Entrepreneurship and the Liberal Arts
L62 286
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course will examine the creative and innovative qualities developed in liberal arts that are crucial to the success of the entrepreneur. We will then move on to examine entrepreneurs in action, hearing from those in the field and reading of others, learning how the liberal arts proved instrumental in various ways to their development and ultimate success as entrepreneurs.

Environmental Studies

Topics in American Politics: Globalization, Urbanization, & the Environment
L82 3752, 3 units
M-F, 3:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

The rapid spread of urbanization has profound consequences for environmental quality--some positive, some negative. As the world economy continues to integrate across traditional political boundaries, such growth in urban areas is likely to continue. This course explores the causes and consequences of urbanization on environmental health and how local environmental conditions may facilitate the growth of modern mega-cities. Among the topics addressed are the effects of demographic changes on rural communities as younger generations seek better economic opportunity in faraway cities; the benefits to environmental quality from an expanding middle class; and the robustness of traditional institutions to changing political-economic demands.

Film & Media Studies

Summer Seminar: Understanding Movies
L53 114, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Students will explore cinema as a language - we will ask questions about what makes cinema compelling, how it makes meaning, and how we look to it to gain perspective on the world around us. To study the language of cinema, we will first and foremost watch movies: films viewed each week will provide us with examples to discuss. Beginning with a study of film technique and basic shot description, we will move into a module on genre before finally looking beyond cinema itself into forms of new media. This is a general introduction to the art of viewing, but in order to demonstrate a knowledge of film technique and style, students will also learn to write about film. Ultimately, they will become skilled in interpreting the messages that that films communicate.

History

The Second World War in History
L22 164, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course is an introduction to World History that uses World War II as a lens to examine the methodologies, approaches and sources historians employ to understand and analyze historical periods. The class will explore the global connections and interactions which characterize World History. The emphasis of this course will be on digging into topics traditionally neglected: the impact of the war on race, gender, family and children; daily life; and daily ethical decision making.

Legal Studies

Logic and Critical Analysis
L84 105G, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course is an introduction to first-order logic. Logic is the study of the formal properties of arguments. In this course we learn how to make arguments precise by formalizing sentences and applying methods of deductive reasoning to prove conclusions. We also discuss the relations between logical reasoning and informal reasoning, and logic and rationality. Why study logic? Logic gives you principles and techniques to distinguish good forms of reasoning, helps you to construct correct arguments, and (to some extent) think orderly. Additionally, logic is essential in other fields that you might also be interested in studying (e.g., mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and analytic philosophy). And of course, logic is a fun and interesting subject in its own right. The course presumes no background in philosophy or logic.


Biomedical Ethics
L84 233F, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.

Linguistics

Introduction to Linguistics
L44 170D, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Language is one of the fundamental capacities of the human species, and there are many interesting and meaningful ways in which it can be studied. This course explores the core components of linguistic theory: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics). It also provides an overview of interdisciplinary ideas and research on how language is acquired and processed, its relation to the mind-brain and to society, and the question of whether the essential properties of language can be replicated outside the human mind (specifically, in chimpanzees or computer programs).

Mathematics & Statistics

Differential Equations
L24 217, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Introduction to ordinary differential equations: first-order equations, linear equations, systems of equations, series solutions, and Laplace transform methods. Computer-aided study of numerical solutions and graphics phase planes. Prerequisite: Math 233 (may be taken concurrently).


Elementary Probability and Statistics
L24 2200, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, hypothesis testing and confidence limits, nonparametric methods, Student's t, analysis of variance, regression, and contingency tables. Graphing calculator with statistical distribution functions (such as the TI-83) may be required. Prerequisite: Math 131.


Matrix Algebra
L24 309, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Theory of matrices and vector spaces from a concrete, computational point of view. Topics: row reduction (pivot method), rank and dimension, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and diagonalization of symmetrical matrices. Prerequisite: Math 132.

Philosophy

Logic and Critical Analysis
L30 100G, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course is an introduction to first-order logic. Logic is the study of the formal properties of arguments. In this course we learn how to make arguments precise by formalizing sentences and applying methods of deductive reasoning to prove conclusions. We also discuss the relations between logical reasoning and informal reasoning, and logic and rationality. Why study logic? Logic gives you principles and techniques to distinguish good forms of reasoning, helps you to construct correct arguments, and (to some extent) think orderly. Additionally, logic is essential in other fields that you might also be interested in studying (e.g., mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and analytic philosophy). And of course, logic is a fun and interesting subject in its own right. The course presumes no background in philosophy or logic.


Great Philosophers
L30 125C, 3 units
M-F, 3:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

What is real beyond perception? What are the limits of human knowledge? What does it mean to act freely? What makes a person good? What makes an act right? And what ultimately matters? In this class, we will confront some of the most puzzling questions we as humans face through discussion of classic philosophical works by some of the greatest minds of all time, including Descartes, Hume, Anscombe, Aristotle, Kant, and Mill.


Biomedical Ethics
L30 233 F, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

A critical examination, in light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. May include euthanasia, genetic engineering, abortion, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.

Political Science

International Politics
L32 103B, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Globalization, the accelerating rate of interaction between people of different countries, creates a qualitative shift in the relationship between nation-states and national economies. Conflict and war is one form of international interaction. Movement of capital, goods, services, production, information, disease, environmental degradation, and people across national boundaries are other forms of international interactions. This course introduces the study of global political-economic relations. We focus upon building a toolkit that will help us understand the micro-foundations of the globalization of material and social relations.


The Trump Administration: An Examination of a New Paradigm for Presidential Leaders
L32 3381, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

This course will examine and assess the promise, progress, and performance of the Trump administration by addressing Trump as the president, the politician, and the person. We will examine Trump's historic upset victories in the Republican primary and the Presidency, including his populist-nationalist political philosophy and campaign strategy. We will study how Trump, the politician, has been able to successfully win the right, despite controversial positions. We will examine how he implements his brand of political-economic strategy and global worldview across contemporary issues, including public activism and Black Lives Matter, immigration and civil liberties, fake news and media literacy, gender issues, the environment, and globalization. The schedule may change in response to political events.


Topics in American Politics: Globalization, Urbanization, & the Environment
L32 3752, 3 units
M-F, 3:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

The rapid spread of urbanization has profound consequences for environmental quality--some positive, some negative. As the world economy continues to integrate across traditional political boundaries, such growth in urban areas is likely to continue. This course explores the causes and consequences of urbanization on environmental health and how local environmental conditions may facilitate the growth of modern mega-cities. Among the topics addressed are the effects of demographic changes on rural communities as younger generations seek better economic opportunity in faraway cities; the benefits to environmental quality from an expanding middle class; and the robustness of traditional institutions to changing political-economic demands.

Psychological & Brain Sciences

Introduction to Psychology
L33 100B, 3 units
M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 10:45 p.m.

Survey and analysis of concepts, research, and theory covering the areas of learning, memory, motivation, personality, social, abnormal, clinical, and biological psychology. Introduces the diversity of questions, areas, approaches, research, and theories that compose the study of mind and behavior.


Abnormal Psychology
L33 354, 3 units
M-F, 11:00 a.m. - 12:45 a.m.

This is an introductory course in psychopathology or the scientific study of mental health disorders. The course will include definitions, theories, and classification of abnormal behavior. Content will focus on symptoms, classification, prevalence, etiology and treatment of mental health disorders, including mood, anxiety, eating, schizophrenia spectrum, substance use, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 100B.

Writing

Rhetoric and Power
L13 212, 3 units
M-F, 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts, is perhaps more relevant today, in a world where diverse opinions reverberate 24/7 from television and the internet, than in ancient times when rhetors invented arguments to help people choose the best course of action when they disagreed about important political, religious, or social issues. How do we make our voices heard? How can we invent and present compelling written discourse? This course will introduce students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and compositional studies. Assignments in this class include rhetorical exercise in invention and craft, imitations, and varied compositions, ranging from the personal to critical, from the biographical to argumentative. We will examine rhetorical principles (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) that are employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, and science. We will aim for a mastery of craft and a refinement of thought.

One-Credit Bonus Courses

Extend your academic exposure by adding on a one-credit course. The options below may be added as a seventh credit (to a two-class, or six-credit academic load) at no extra cost.

Dance

Introduction to Contemporary Pop Dance Styles
U31 216, 1 unit
M&W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

This course will be an introduction to the fundamentals of contemporary jazz, hip hop, and other popular dance styles. This is primarily a studio course with some reading on the development of these dance forms. The course will also explore the culture and music of hip-hop and other related styles of dance such as street jazz and pop/culture dance. After an introduction to hip-hop dance technique, students will demonstrate hip-hop dance skills through warm-ups and choreographed routines. Students will also learn contemporary jazz and lyrical technique with emphasis on rock, funky, lyric and percussive movement blended with elements of theatrical jazz, modern, and ballet. As a whole, this class will focus on strengthening movement skills through increased flexibility, strength and endurance, while sharpening musical awareness, learning choreography and exploring improvisation, and understanding the appropriate vocabulary needed to develop strong technique for these styles. Previous movement training recommended but not required.


Tap Dance: Beginning
U31 225, 1 unit
M&W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

Introduction to basic tap steps and rhythms. Development of awareness of varied tap dance styles. No previous dance training required.

English Composition

Adventures in Personal Writing
U11 115, 1 unit
M&W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

This course will experiment with different forms of personal narrative writing, giving students an opportunity to have fun expressing themselves across a mix of styles and approaches.

Music

How to Listen to Popular Music
U24 1061, 1 unit
M&W, 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Learn to talk and write about popular music. We will consider all kinds of popular music: American and not, from the entire history of recorded sound. Issues of technology, the music industry, genre, musical form and style, gender, sexuality, and social class will all be considered. Coursework includes listening to and reading about music, writing in various online-friendly formats, and making short videos and podcasts.

The 2020 application cycle is now open.

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